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Poll

In which of the following countries / regions do you think people are MOST afraid of death?

USA
- 17 (73.9%)
China
- 0 (0%)
India  (just the Hindus)
- 0 (0%)
Japan
- 1 (4.3%)
Northern Europe  (Germanic, Baltic)
- 3 (13%)
Southern Europe  (Latin)
- 0 (0%)
Eastern Europe  (Slavic, etc)
- 1 (4.3%)
Latin America
- 1 (4.3%)
Muslim World
- 0 (0%)
Sub-Saharan Africa
- 0 (0%)

Total Members Voted: 13


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Author Topic: Fear of Death in Different Cultures  (Read 15220 times)

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Sam Gunn (since nobody got Admiral Naismith)

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Re: Fear of Death in Different Cultures
« Reply #15 on: May 05, 2009, 04:47:10 PM »

Communist Russia was not 90% Jewish.  What the hell are you talking about Alex?
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Ghost of Alex Libman

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Re: Fear of Death in Different Cultures
« Reply #16 on: May 05, 2009, 05:03:10 PM »

Let's please fork this conversation to a new "Jews and Communism" thread to keep this thread on-topic.
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LordMarius

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Re: Fear of Death in Different Cultures
« Reply #17 on: May 06, 2009, 05:20:36 AM »

I see fear of death as one of the highest virtues, BTW.  Thus this poll.  Fear of death is the most rational emotion, especially if it drives an individual to do rational things to avoid / postpone death.  As a cultural attribute, it will tell how willing a culture would be to overcome tradition and other irrational attachments, and strive to fight for every second of human life through science.

There are some unfounded blanket statements in what you just wrote. Look at the US, where the percentage of very religious people are way higher than in Europe, the fear of death is very strong. But at the same time, religious people fear life. They fear their urges to live their life as is human, because they have this weird idea that they will be punished for it after death. They also fear science, especially science that leads to longer lives, because they think it is wrong to fiddle with what they think their god made.

The real virtue is love of life, love of life is what will help you on the way to live your life to the fullest. Fear of death makes you fear life.
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Ghost of Alex Libman

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Re: Fear of Death in Different Cultures
« Reply #18 on: May 06, 2009, 05:30:20 AM »

This thread is all about unfounded blanket statements.  :twisted:

But, yeah, I do see your point.
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davann

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Re: Fear of Death in Different Cultures
« Reply #19 on: May 06, 2009, 06:33:40 PM »

I see fear of death as one of the highest virtues, BTW.  Thus this poll.  Fear of death is the most rational emotion, especially if it drives an individual to do rational things to avoid / postpone death.  As a cultural attribute, it will tell how willing a culture would be to overcome tradition and other irrational attachments, and strive to fight for every second of human life through science.

There are some unfounded blanket statements in what you just wrote. Look at the US, where the percentage of very religious people are way higher than in Europe, the fear of death is very strong. But at the same time, religious people fear life. They fear their urges to live their life as is human, because they have this weird idea that they will be punished for it after death. They also fear science, especially science that leads to longer lives, because they think it is wrong to fiddle with what they think their god made.

The real virtue is love of life, love of life is what will help you on the way to live your life to the fullest. Fear of death makes you fear life.

I've heard the claim that Americans are more religious then Europeons. I doubt it. Sure a great majority will answer yes to believing in a god but I would estimate that only about 20% are actually religious. Maybe less.

One of the reasons Americans would say yes to god belief in a survey is because they think it is the right answer to something they have never really given much thought to. While a larger percentage of Europeans have obviously given the matter some thought and have arrived at atheism. Keep in mind one truth that a very large percentage of Americans are is stupid/ignorant. If it ain't pro sports, the newest electronic gizmo's or Dancing with the Stars it is just not on Joe or Jane America's radar. They are sheep and sheep don't worship.

All of which is IMO.
« Last Edit: May 06, 2009, 06:35:42 PM by davann »
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Re: Fear of Death in Different Cultures
« Reply #20 on: May 07, 2009, 06:25:23 AM »

I see fear of death as one of the highest virtues, BTW.  Thus this poll.  Fear of death is the most rational emotion, especially if it drives an individual to do rational things to avoid / postpone death.  As a cultural attribute, it will tell how willing a culture would be to overcome tradition and other irrational attachments, and strive to fight for every second of human life through science.

There are some unfounded blanket statements in what you just wrote. Look at the US, where the percentage of very religious people are way higher than in Europe, the fear of death is very strong. But at the same time, religious people fear life. They fear their urges to live their life as is human, because they have this weird idea that they will be punished for it after death. They also fear science, especially science that leads to longer lives, because they think it is wrong to fiddle with what they think their god made.

The real virtue is love of life, love of life is what will help you on the way to live your life to the fullest. Fear of death makes you fear life.

I've heard the claim that Americans are more religious then Europeons. I doubt it. Sure a great majority will answer yes to believing in a god but I would estimate that only about 20% are actually religious. Maybe less.

One of the reasons Americans would say yes to god belief in a survey is because they think it is the right answer to something they have never really given much thought to. While a larger percentage of Europeans have obviously given the matter some thought and have arrived at atheism. Keep in mind one truth that a very large percentage of Americans are is stupid/ignorant. If it ain't pro sports, the newest electronic gizmo's or Dancing with the Stars it is just not on Joe or Jane America's radar. They are sheep and sheep don't worship.

All of which is IMO.

The stereotype of the stupid/ignorant American is just that; a stereotype. Your random Norwegian, Swede or Japanese is just as ignorant as a random American. People know and believe what they are taught. Over here it's marxist economic ideas, over there it's belief in god. If you approach one or the other with ideas that are contrary to what they are taught, neither the American nor the Norwegian will believe you for a second no matter how good your arguments are, not even if you can produce smoking gun type evidence. A good 80% of the population in Norway will answer to a survey that they are christians, which is what they are taught to believe. But if they're asked if they believe in a god, only about 30% will answer yes.

I think the question of belief in evolution is a great marker on how religious people really are, because it adds another layer of complexity to the matter other than just "Do you believ in god?". Americans don't believe in evolution, Americans believe that some kind of magic being miracled the universe and the world into existence. I think that if you're so religious that you actually believe in that story, then you're likely to believe a whole lot of the other stories in that book. And presto, you have a population that fears both life and death because of their religious beliefs.

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davann

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Re: Fear of Death in Different Cultures
« Reply #21 on: May 07, 2009, 01:09:56 PM »

I see fear of death as one of the highest virtues, BTW.  Thus this poll.  Fear of death is the most rational emotion, especially if it drives an individual to do rational things to avoid / postpone death.  As a cultural attribute, it will tell how willing a culture would be to overcome tradition and other irrational attachments, and strive to fight for every second of human life through science.

There are some unfounded blanket statements in what you just wrote. Look at the US, where the percentage of very religious people are way higher than in Europe, the fear of death is very strong. But at the same time, religious people fear life. They fear their urges to live their life as is human, because they have this weird idea that they will be punished for it after death. They also fear science, especially science that leads to longer lives, because they think it is wrong to fiddle with what they think their god made.

The real virtue is love of life, love of life is what will help you on the way to live your life to the fullest. Fear of death makes you fear life.

I've heard the claim that Americans are more religious then Europeons. I doubt it. Sure a great majority will answer yes to believing in a god but I would estimate that only about 20% are actually religious. Maybe less.

One of the reasons Americans would say yes to god belief in a survey is because they think it is the right answer to something they have never really given much thought to. While a larger percentage of Europeans have obviously given the matter some thought and have arrived at atheism. Keep in mind one truth that a very large percentage of Americans are is stupid/ignorant. If it ain't pro sports, the newest electronic gizmo's or Dancing with the Stars it is just not on Joe or Jane America's radar. They are sheep and sheep don't worship.

All of which is IMO.

The stereotype of the stupid/ignorant American is just that; a stereotype. Your random Norwegian, Swede or Japanese is just as ignorant as a random American. People know and believe what they are taught. Over here it's marxist economic ideas, over there it's belief in god. If you approach one or the other with ideas that are contrary to what they are taught, neither the American nor the Norwegian will believe you for a second no matter how good your arguments are, not even if you can produce smoking gun type evidence. A good 80% of the population in Norway will answer to a survey that they are christians, which is what they are taught to believe. But if they're asked if they believe in a god, only about 30% will answer yes.

I think the question of belief in evolution is a great marker on how religious people really are, because it adds another layer of complexity to the matter other than just "Do you believ in god?". Americans don't believe in evolution, Americans believe that some kind of magic being miracled the universe and the world into existence. I think that if you're so religious that you actually believe in that story, then you're likely to believe a whole lot of the other stories in that book. And presto, you have a population that fears both life and death because of their religious beliefs.



Gotta strongly disagree that American's are not ignorant and stupid. They take pride in it for christ's sake. How do think an obvious dangerous moron like Bush can get elected? It was because American's identified with him. "Hey, he clears brush just like me. He's my kinda guy. I'd love to kick back and have a brew with that guy."

It is a defense mechanism. American's are afraid of death and other deep subjects by nature. It is easier to turn on the boob tube and vegetate.

Absolutely not a stereotype. Americans are dumb asses by choice.
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libertylover

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Re: Fear of Death in Different Cultures
« Reply #22 on: May 07, 2009, 01:25:57 PM »



I don't believe in Polls especially vague ones like this piece of garbage.  What did they generate their caller list from a church registry? 
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Alex Libman 14

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Re: Fear of Death in Different Cultures
« Reply #23 on: May 23, 2009, 08:13:29 AM »

Way to bring down the mystique of this thread with statistics...  Let's try again...  Setting the mood...


*BUMP'd*  :lol:
« Last Edit: May 23, 2009, 08:15:17 AM by Alex Libman 17 »
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CaL DaVe

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Re: Fear of Death in Different Cultures
« Reply #24 on: August 07, 2009, 07:51:59 PM »

Paraphrasing Socrates/Plato (one of the five dialogs I forget which one):

If you take the stance that there is no afterlife, then being dead should be a lot like not being born. Which is not so bad if you think about it. So then why should one fear death after their existence? It is much more rational to fear that there was once a time when one had never existed.
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Re: Fear of Death in Different Cultures
« Reply #25 on: August 07, 2009, 08:09:08 PM »

I love the Mark Twain quote, which goes (something like): "I have no fear of death. I was dead for billions of years before I was born, and suffered not the least inconvenience for it."
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Alex Libman 15

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Re: Fear of Death in Different Cultures
« Reply #26 on: August 08, 2009, 12:42:52 PM »

That's a comforting thing to say to a dying atheist, but ultimately - it's bullshit.

It might make death seem less painful, but it doesn't change the fact that life is more desirable than death.  The fact that your life is precious and seemingly improbable in the greater scheme of things doesn't make it any less desirable.

Constructive fear of death is a good thing, in my opinion, and it is very honorable to fight for every inch and every second of life.  I'd like to die with my hands touching a laptop, which I'd be using not just for emotional support but in pursuit of something constructive.
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Diogenes The Cynic

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Re: Fear of Death in Different Cultures
« Reply #27 on: September 13, 2009, 09:17:36 AM »

Latin America, more uneducated deeply religious people belonging to a faith that doesn't glorify death. 

Mexico glorifies their dead.

But, I wouldn't take that to mean, Mexicans are think if only I were dead then people would like me.  They respect their dead.  

When I think of glorifying death, I mean when the culture glorifies suicide or martyrdom.  Early Christian doctrine did glorify martyrdom for the religion.  But the church now doesn't see that as such a noble cause.  However, even here in our culture we do glorify self sacrifice of individuals to save others.  For example the solider that jumps on a ied to protest his squad from the blast and ends up dead.  Then is awarded the Metal of Honor.  In Japan and Ancient Rome, suicide was expected and never frowned upon.  Fundamentalist Muslims think if they die for their religion a glorious afterlife awaits them.
Hindi and Buddhist believe in reincarnation but I am not sure that is more or less reassuring than notions of a heaven.   The reason I pick Latin America is while they believe in heaven as a means of being comforted in the face of death.  They are also fearful of the judgment and being sent to hell.  This tends to be a mainstream Christian thought.  

I interpreted the question as a fear of death.  Only a suicidal person holds their own life cheaply.  The argument that life is cheap in other countries only means people are willing to kill others.  This doesn't address the killers' personal fears of death.  

On the flip side I would think the most fearless group of people are the Jews of Israel.  If I am not mistaken they have no concept of hell.  They have a waiting period after death to pay for sins before being allowed into heaven.  No eternal damnation.  Retribution for sins will be taken out during the person's lifetime.  
Jews do not believe in Hell, but I don't think that makes us more fearless of death.  To Jews life is the most important thing of all.  Our philosophy glorifies life and believes that one should always fight to protect and improve it.  As opposed to say Latin America where life is cheap.

We have a hell. Its called Gehinom. Only conservative, and reform dont believe in it, but they are not mainstream Jewish views.
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Re: Fear of Death in Different Cultures
« Reply #28 on: September 13, 2009, 09:20:17 AM »

I see fear of death as one of the highest virtues, BTW.  Thus this poll.  Fear of death is the most rational emotion, especially if it drives an individual to do rational things to avoid / postpone death.  As a cultural attribute, it will tell how willing a culture would be to overcome tradition and other irrational attachments, and strive to fight for every second of human life through science.

I think them "cheese-eating surrender monkeys" are ahead of the English-speaking world when it comes to this sort of stuff, and the wealthier Northern Europeans are probably #1.


To Jews life is the most important thing of all.

Then what's up with the mass suicide at Masada?

And traditional use of the death penalty for simplest things?

And all the Russian commies around the turn of the 20th century (90% Jews) wanting to destroy the old world and build a new one, no matter the cost?  :x

(EDIT: the conversation about that last point to be spun off to the "Jews and Communism" thread to keep this thread on-topic.)


The death penalty was by nature very difficult to impose.
The communist Jews were not Orthodox, so their views were not mainstream Jewish thought. For them being Jewish was incidental to being communist.
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Re: Fear of Death in Different Cultures
« Reply #29 on: September 13, 2009, 10:36:01 AM »

All animals share a fear of death. It's part of the biological programing that keeps them alive. Animals that lacked this fear died while those that had it tried harder to avoid death.

What makes humans unique is the knowledge that death is inevitable. Of all critters, only we know for sure that we will die. This sets up a tension between the desire to stay alive and the certain knowledge of death. This tension is resolved by rationalizations, usually in the form of religion. "Well, I may die in this world. But, I'll live forever in the next." (That is, if I obey the priests and give lots of money to the church.)
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