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anarchir

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Re: Mad Max / Off the Grid tips n' tricks
« Reply #60 on: June 02, 2010, 04:58:06 PM »



I don't know what makes idiots think this is a copyright violation.  IMO, it's usually an attempt to AVOID copying W/O permission.

Are you referring to the fact that I quoted rather than simply posted? I only posted it because I wanted to show that the link does work and goes to the content referred to. The other reason to quote is because you want to show the content of the article and then still be able to comment on it separately. Also, to avoid TL/DR situations you may just want to quote a certain section of reading for the intended audience.

I dont care about "copying without permission" unless someone tries to pass it off as their own. Then all that needs to be done is the poster should be called out on their BS in a public place so others may avoid their content.

No, I'm referring to the idiots who replaced the picture with a message claiming copyright enfringment (sorta like I said.)

Oh ok then.
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anarchir

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Re: Mad Max / Off the Grid tips n' tricks
« Reply #61 on: June 02, 2010, 05:00:47 PM »

I still dont see where that happened though but whatever... I still see a pic of a tv hooked up to a generator.
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Cognitive Dissident

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Re: Mad Max / Off the Grid tips n' tricks
« Reply #62 on: June 02, 2010, 05:02:59 PM »

I still dont see where that happened though but whatever... I still see a pic of a tv hooked up to a generator.

That could be the confusion.  The rest of us see an image of a TV test pattern with the message "Hot-linking this image is not authorized by the copyright holder.  Contact the website who is using this image and ask them to remove it."
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alaric89

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Re: Mad Max / Off the Grid tips n' tricks
« Reply #63 on: August 19, 2010, 06:01:14 PM »


 
Bump. This is all I got right now, but I missed the thread, and I am sick of the middle East stuff.
After the birth of my youngest I had to quit the gym. I will be starting again soon but I am so out of shape I lashed some junk together to get a little back in the groove before I go back. Its a 7' long pipe, a pulley from the ceiling, and two 25L jugs. I use it as a standard barbell for several exercises the jugs hang off the chains on each end of the pipe. And I do several pull down exercises from the pulley. (little pic)
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TimeLady Victorious

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Re: Mad Max / Off the Grid tips n' tricks
« Reply #64 on: August 19, 2010, 06:29:30 PM »

Don't forget building giant fucking antennas to get in OTA TV, radio, and WiFi too.

http://retrothing.typepad.com/photos/uncategorized/2008/04/04/grayhoverman.jpg
« Last Edit: August 20, 2010, 01:17:38 AM by TimeLady Victorious »
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alaric89

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Re: Mad Max / Off the Grid tips n' tricks
« Reply #65 on: September 27, 2010, 04:22:26 PM »



A hobby I have, is making ridiculously large Bowie knives. I hadn't made one for awhile, but my daughter wanted to see it done, so I made this one over the weekend.

hellbilly

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Re: Mad Max / Off the Grid tips n' tricks
« Reply #66 on: September 27, 2010, 05:00:23 PM »

That looks good. How's it done? Grinders & buffers?

I'd forgotten about this thread & just remembered this link:
http://www.blacksmithchic.com/book.htm

Quote
The Backyard Blacksmith shows you how -- with some patience and a working knowledge of metals, basic tools, and techniques -- blacksmithing can be easy to learn, and a rewarding hobby. Through instructions and illustrations, readers will learn to make simple tools and useful items, such as nails, hinges, and handles, and also an interesting mix of artful projects, such letter openers, door knockers and botanical ornaments.

A few years ago I helped a guy pour some bronze sculptures in a backyard foundry he had set up. Barrels & sand & a large torch hooked up to a natural gas line. It was awesome.
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davann

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Re: Mad Max / Off the Grid tips n' tricks
« Reply #67 on: September 27, 2010, 07:26:41 PM »

That looks good. How's it done? Grinders & buffers?

I'd forgotten about this thread & just remembered this link:
http://www.blacksmithchic.com/book.htm

Quote
The Backyard Blacksmith shows you how -- with some patience and a working knowledge of metals, basic tools, and techniques -- blacksmithing can be easy to learn, and a rewarding hobby. Through instructions and illustrations, readers will learn to make simple tools and useful items, such as nails, hinges, and handles, and also an interesting mix of artful projects, such letter openers, door knockers and botanical ornaments.

A few years ago I helped a guy pour some bronze sculptures in a backyard foundry he had set up. Barrels & sand & a large torch hooked up to a natural gas line. It was awesome.



Iíve always wanted to try backyard blacksmithing. A couple of months ago I looked briefly into it and then forgot about it for some reason. There is even a gas line all ready to go in the backyard. Do you know if your neighbor needed a special line or would a regular line for a grill work?

Setting something like this up would give me bonus points at work I think. Using the company product in new (old) ways. Iíd be the talk on the third floor for couple of days at least. Brownie points!
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Bill Brasky

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Re: Mad Max / Off the Grid tips n' tricks
« Reply #68 on: September 27, 2010, 09:14:51 PM »

That looks good. How's it done? Grinders & buffers?

I'd forgotten about this thread & just remembered this link:
http://www.blacksmithchic.com/book.htm

Quote
The Backyard Blacksmith shows you how -- with some patience and a working knowledge of metals, basic tools, and techniques -- blacksmithing can be easy to learn, and a rewarding hobby. Through instructions and illustrations, readers will learn to make simple tools and useful items, such as nails, hinges, and handles, and also an interesting mix of artful projects, such letter openers, door knockers and botanical ornaments.

A few years ago I helped a guy pour some bronze sculptures in a backyard foundry he had set up. Barrels & sand & a large torch hooked up to a natural gas line. It was awesome.



Iíve always wanted to try backyard blacksmithing. A couple of months ago I looked briefly into it and then forgot about it for some reason. There is even a gas line all ready to go in the backyard. Do you know if your neighbor needed a special line or would a regular line for a grill work?

Setting something like this up would give me bonus points at work I think. Using the company product in new (old) ways. Iíd be the talk on the third floor for couple of days at least. Brownie points!


Gas fire doesn't generate the kind of heat you need for blacksmithing.  If by blacksmithing you mean pounding red-hot iron on an anvil.  They do it in coal so they can shove the metal in the coalbed and let it melt until its mailable. 

You could use your gas line to light the coal, which is harder than you may think.   But a portable tank is just as efficient.  I would assume a modern forge would be gas-lit, thats how I'd make one. 

I watched a guy on History make samurai swords the other day.  Fuckin awesome. 
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alaric89

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Re: Mad Max / Off the Grid tips n' tricks
« Reply #69 on: September 28, 2010, 06:17:30 AM »

hellbilly
How's it done? Grinders & buffers?

Tools I used: Angle grinder, multidirectional vice, belt sander, welder, table saw, drillpress.
Yeah, I just cut the basic shape out of 4mm stainless and carved it out with the angle grinder and a belt sander. The grip is made out of a peace of birch I cut from a log out of my firewood pile. The hand guard is welded on.

davann

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Re: Mad Max / Off the Grid tips n' tricks
« Reply #70 on: September 28, 2010, 10:49:21 AM »

That looks good. How's it done? Grinders & buffers?

I'd forgotten about this thread & just remembered this link:
http://www.blacksmithchic.com/book.htm

Quote
The Backyard Blacksmith shows you how -- with some patience and a working knowledge of metals, basic tools, and techniques -- blacksmithing can be easy to learn, and a rewarding hobby. Through instructions and illustrations, readers will learn to make simple tools and useful items, such as nails, hinges, and handles, and also an interesting mix of artful projects, such letter openers, door knockers and botanical ornaments.

A few years ago I helped a guy pour some bronze sculptures in a backyard foundry he had set up. Barrels & sand & a large torch hooked up to a natural gas line. It was awesome.



Iíve always wanted to try backyard blacksmithing. A couple of months ago I looked briefly into it and then forgot about it for some reason. There is even a gas line all ready to go in the backyard. Do you know if your neighbor needed a special line or would a regular line for a grill work?

Setting something like this up would give me bonus points at work I think. Using the company product in new (old) ways. Iíd be the talk on the third floor for couple of days at least. Brownie points!


Gas fire doesn't generate the kind of heat you need for blacksmithing.  If by blacksmithing you mean pounding red-hot iron on an anvil.  They do it in coal so they can shove the metal in the coalbed and let it melt until its mailable.  

You could use your gas line to light the coal, which is harder than you may think.   But a portable tank is just as efficient.  I would assume a modern forge would be gas-lit, thats how I'd make one.  

I watched a guy on History make samurai swords the other day.  Fuckin awesome.  

Good to know. I absolutely plan on looking into this again now the temp is coming down to a reasonable level.
« Last Edit: September 28, 2010, 01:00:13 PM by davann »
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hellbilly

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Re: Mad Max / Off the Grid tips n' tricks
« Reply #71 on: September 28, 2010, 07:10:19 PM »

You can set up a natural gas or propane forge to do your blacksmithing. Instead of resting your metal in the coals, you insert it into the forge to heat it up, and then go beat it out on the anvil. Plus- you're not breathing coal smoke, to much of that and you'll get nerve damage (at least).

I think the trick with the natural gas method is that you need a good amount of pressure coming through the lines.

That's a good lookin' knife alaric.

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Bill Brasky

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Re: Mad Max / Off the Grid tips n' tricks
« Reply #72 on: September 28, 2010, 08:36:02 PM »

You can set up a natural gas or propane forge to do your blacksmithing. Instead of resting your metal in the coals, you insert it into the forge to heat it up, and then go beat it out on the anvil. Plus- you're not breathing coal smoke, to much of that and you'll get nerve damage (at least).

I think the trick with the natural gas method is that you need a good amount of pressure coming through the lines.

That's a good lookin' knife alaric.



Gas Forges.

What about natural gas and Propane?

Blacksmiths today now have access to gas-fired forges and furnaces as well as coal and coke forges to heat the iron. Gas forges offer the convenience of not having to worry about where to buy good smithing coal. Gas forges are not as hot as coal forges and take longer to heat the iron to a forging temperature. In all cases the lower heat value of gas means longer heat times and more oxidation. However the size and capacity of the gas forge allows a much larger number of straight un-worked, or nearly straight bars to be placed in the fire at one time, and therefore can heat more un-worked bars over a longer period of time than the coal forge. This last point is the reason why a business needing forgings is more likely to have a gas forge than a coal forge. On the other hand the coal forge is still king when higher heats on larger and heavier bars are needed, and fewer bars are to be heated for work, and for heating work of more complex shape which cannot be placed inside the limited interior area of the gas forge. Each type of forge (coal or gas) has its advantages and disadvantages, and this is why each shop must choose what type of setup works best in their situation. Many shops employ both gas and coal forges and use them each for specific tasks such as-coal for heavy bars and gas for large numbers of small work.

Most gas forges never get up to welding heat.

Contrary to what most hobbyists are claiming today, most factory-made gas forges cannot reach welding heat. Don't be fooled by the claims of amateurs that they forge weld all the time with this or that forge. Most amateurs are simply boasting of being able to do something that they have never actually done. Most factory-made gas forges cannot reach welding heat, and the few that can, will heat the iron much more slowly. During the last 25 years, a new welding flux was introduced specifically for allowing gas forges (those forges that are actually capable of reaching welding heat) to be used for welding. This special flux is formulated for the increased scaling that results from longer heat times when using the gas forge.

The lower temperature and slower heating associated with the gas forge is actually helpful to most beginner smiths and those with poor fire skills because, a cheap gas forge will not heat the iron to a sizzling white heat- suddenly destroying the iron. Instead the iron will waste away (slowly burning) in the fire over a long period of time, but the inexperienced smith need not worry about suddenly destroying his iron by accidentally leaving it in the fire too long. On the other hand...

Some gas forges CAN get hot enough to fire weld!

There are some homemade and custom designed gas forges that can reach this higher heat. If the reader is going the gas forge route, I recommend visiting Ron Reil's website to see how to design the hotter custom-made forges at http://ronreil.abana.org/design1.shtml . Ron has compiled a large collection of designs both of his own and those sent to him by friends. Lots of designs of burners, insulation, most are inexpensive. These guys keep adding more stuff.

Special fluxes needed for fire welding with gas forges.

Since gas forges will take longer to heat iron, more oxidation will develop during the extended heating period. Special fluxes are used to deal with the additional scaling which results from this oxidation. Centaur Forge sells these fluxes.




http://www.beautifuliron.com/smithforge.htm
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hellbilly

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Re: Mad Max / Off the Grid tips n' tricks
« Reply #73 on: September 28, 2010, 09:19:14 PM »

I see that the welding gloves have come off.



I acknowledge your challenge and my return volley is thus:

http://www.iplayerhd.com/player/player-DBCA888B-4C95-4448-8D40-4F4923566CE0.aspx

If you've watched the end of the video you will have noted the white-hot ore ready to be forged. I concede that quality and lasting welds will require higher temperatures, however, a gas forge will do well for many backyard projects -- particularly a forge that has a round shape, as the one in the video.
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alaric89

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Re: Mad Max / Off the Grid tips n' tricks
« Reply #74 on: September 29, 2010, 11:38:24 AM »

Thanks for the compliment, hellbilly. :D
Forges don't have to be complicated. I saw at a "iron age" working museum in Sweden a forge that consisted of a indention in the ground a pipe and a simple belows. Worked fine. Used coal of course.
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