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John Shaw

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Bulk food storage, sources, and buying experiences.
« on: October 21, 2011, 01:45:23 PM »

Do you have a stock of provender?

I think having three months or more worth of food is generally a good thing, but we're not crazy about it. How about you?

We've found that both Emergency Essentials and Honeyville Food Products are pretty good suppliers and the prices are pretty good, but I'm always interested in hearing about where people get stuff.

Any other good suppliers?

Also, talk to me about your rotation methods and shit.

If you buy bulk bags, how do you like to store stuff?
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Laetitia

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Re: Bulk food storage, sources, and buying experiences.
« Reply #1 on: October 21, 2011, 01:57:31 PM »

Also, talk to me about your rotation methods and shit.

If you buy bulk bags, how do you like to store stuff?

I don't have the storage for a 3 month pantry, but I can manage 3-4 weeks.

With the international markets here in Atlanta, I'm good for opportunities to buy in bulk.
Knowing how real people are rotating and storing would be great. That's the biggest reason I don't get more.
The online stuff I've read so far seems to be for people who live in a bubble and can store in ideal conditions for a longer periods, or for people with 6-10 kids, making rotating go more quickly.

Even with 4 loaves of bread and several batches of pancakes, biscuits, etc each week, it takes long enough to go through 10 lb bag of flour that I get hit with the pantry moths before I can finish it. Same thing for oats and cornmeal. Rice, beans, canned goods are easier, but I need to get more organized about those too.
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Turd Ferguson

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Re: Bulk food storage, sources, and buying experiences.
« Reply #2 on: October 22, 2011, 11:04:55 AM »

I have the Mountain House #10 cans of freeze-dried chili-mac.

The stuffs pretty tasty. You should give it a try, if you like such things, I promise you wont be disappointed.

Beyond that, I just have dry goods, beans, rice and other things you can get at any grocery store. I generally put store bought things in order on a shelf in the basement as I buy them. For instance, sardines get the new stuff put in the back, then when I grab a can, I take it from the front and any new purchase goes in the back, always pushing the stuff forward, sorta like a bottle of Coke from a vending machine.

I have a MSR water filter and the MSR purifier for that extra last step if needed. I dont store water..........too much of a pain in the ass. I figure its just something I would prepare on  the fly when the need came up.

Beyond that, I dont really think too much about it. No checklist, no inventory sheet or any of that. Just simple rotation back to front as I use it.

If the shit ever hit the fan, I would rely quite a bit on hunting critters for a source of protien as well.
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Bill Brasky

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Re: Bulk food storage, sources, and buying experiences.
« Reply #3 on: October 22, 2011, 12:10:16 PM »

I used to keep about two months larder.  But it wasn't because of paranoia or whatever, it was actual living requirements. 

The last place I was living, the store was too far away for convenience, and I didn't have a car. 

So I kept a bunch of dry bulk along with it, nothing that would impress anyone.  Bags of rice, bags of beans.  They're cheap enough.  I didn't take any protective measures with them, because the bags sometimes have micro-holes in them for a reason.  I figured they were less likely to rot if I allowed them to achieve symbiosis with the natural atmosphere.  A few bugs won't hurt me, but mold probably would.

The rest was Spam and soups and veggies in cans.  Some Ramen.  A lot of crackers (I like crackers anyway).  Ham spread.  Peanut butter.  And a reasonably stocked fridge. 

I had a regular sized apartment kitchen.  Six cabinets down, six cabinets up.  Three had glassware and cooking pots.  The rest had the foodstuffs.

It wasn't a bad little setup for a single guy.  I doubt the whole works was worth more than four hundred bucks. 

Now I have a grocery spitting distance, so I don't care.  I'm not a big believer in armageddon.  I still keep a pantry but it's not as large. 

I always have a thousand pounds of meat living right next door, so..  whatever. 





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Turd Ferguson

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Re: Bulk food storage, sources, and buying experiences.
« Reply #4 on: October 22, 2011, 12:33:47 PM »


  I'm not a big believer in armageddon. 

I'm not either, BUT I do believe it is possible. If I had to put odds on it, id say about 10/1 against it ever happening in my lifetime.

I look at it the same way I do a fire exstinguisher. Odds are you will never use it, but why not have it just incase. If I never use it, fine, no sweat off my balls.
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Bill Brasky

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Re: Bulk food storage, sources, and buying experiences.
« Reply #5 on: October 22, 2011, 12:58:20 PM »


  I'm not a big believer in armageddon. 

I'm not either, BUT I do believe it is possible. If I had to put odds on it, id say about 10/1 against it ever happening in my lifetime.

I look at it the same way I do a fire exstinguisher. Odds are you will never use it, but why not have it just incase. If I never use it, fine, no sweat off my balls.

Yeah, I agree. 

But I never contemplated shooting people if I didn't have a fire extinguisher. 

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alaric89

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Re: Bulk food storage, sources, and buying experiences.
« Reply #6 on: October 22, 2011, 01:07:24 PM »

Not that I am very good at it, but I try and have good relationships with local farmers and fishermen. Watching my father throw money down a well for 40 years on stuff that goes to waste makes me try for things that end up positive for my family whether TSHTF or not. A little trick Nowegians do that I never saw in the U.S. is they take fish (mostly cod but whatever works they say) clean and split them so they hang then dry them outdoors on racks. Makes kind of a fish jerky.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stockfish

Bill Brasky

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Re: Bulk food storage, sources, and buying experiences.
« Reply #7 on: October 22, 2011, 01:17:15 PM »

Not that I am very good at it, but I try and have good relationships with local farmers and fishermen. Watching my father throw money down a well for 40 years on stuff that goes to waste makes me try for things that end up positive for my family whether TSHTF or not. A little trick Nowegians do that I never saw in the U.S. is they take fish (mostly cod but whatever works they say) clean and split them so they hang then dry them outdoors on racks. Makes kind of a fish jerky.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stockfish

People do that here, except its more common with venison. 

The native americans and Aleutian eskimos (whatever is appropriate to call them) commonly do fish.  Or, they did, until canned foods became all the rage. 

I've never eaten the outdoor venison, but I know truckloads of people who do it in an oven or dehydrator.  This is Appalachia, man.  We used to eat coal with whiskey on it. 

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alaric89

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Re: Bulk food storage, sources, and buying experiences.
« Reply #8 on: October 22, 2011, 01:58:00 PM »

Here in Norway they pay certain bureaucrats to count the wildlife and go after poachers with more intensity then a mass murderer. (much less then 90 minute response time) Cod, anybody even a foreigner can pretty much catch all they want. That drying process is basically free except for labour. What I am suggesting is every locality has some cheap and non risk long term storage food. My dad for example decided he couldn't deal with butchering jackrabbits (The free food of the Montanan plains at the time) because he is a cat person and rabbits look a lot like Kitties once the head is lopped off. I think the rabbit hunting- skinning- eating type concepts are a lot better than using precious storage space for 3 months worth of food concept.
Last time the survivalist started to make sense to a lot of regular folks (1976-1983 I am guessing) The government already had a lot of anti hoarder propaganda ready to go. I am sure it is still around.

Turd Ferguson

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Re: Bulk food storage, sources, and buying experiences.
« Reply #9 on: October 22, 2011, 03:28:55 PM »

The way I did it was everytime I go to the grocery store, I buy two or three of everything I would normally buy just one of. Stick the other two on the shelf. That way, you know for a fact that you are buying stuff you're actually gonna use. Before you know it, you are all set without even really thinking about it.

 I hear about some people buying weird survival shit that is out of the ordinary and ask myself why they would do that. In that situation, seems you would want things to be as "normal" as possible, so storing things you already use just seemed to make the most sense to me. 

The dried fish seems like a good idea though.
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Bill Brasky

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Re: Bulk food storage, sources, and buying experiences.
« Reply #10 on: October 22, 2011, 03:43:57 PM »

The way I did it was everytime I go to the grocery store, I buy two or three of everything I would normally buy just one of. Stick the other two on the shelf. That way, you know for a fact that you are buying stuff you're actually gonna use. Before you know it, you are all set without even really thinking about it.

 I hear about some people buying weird survival shit that is out of the ordinary and ask myself why they would do that. In that situation, seems you would want things to be as "normal" as possible, so storing things you already use just seemed to make the most sense to me. 

The dried fish seems like a good idea though.

Yea, thats how I did mine, too.  There was nothing out of the ordinary, except for the bulk beans and rice.  They just seemed like a good idea.  I ended up pitching a big pile into the food barrel at Thanksgiving. 

I saw a HUUUGE survivalist store for Mormons on the History Channel.  I'd like to check a place like that out. 

The only places we have like that around here is Dicks, which'll charge you $11.99 for a freeze-dried peanut, or the Stinky Old Grumpy Fuck Surplus Store.  God knows where they got their stuff, but I think half the meats in their MRE's are extinct. 

Y'know, places like that piss me off.  I wanted a keychain Swiss Army Knife this summer.  Went there, nope.  How about a Ka-Bar?  Nope. 

So I went across the street, to a fucking mountaineering shop.  Where you can buy genuine mountaineering shit, like pitons and carabiners (the real ones). 

You think they had fucking Swiss Army knives?  I felt like I was speaking Swahili.  You don't have Swiss Army knives?  Nope.  You know, Victorinox, with the red handle?  Nope.

Head, blown.

 
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alaric89

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Re: Bulk food storage, sources, and buying experiences.
« Reply #11 on: October 22, 2011, 04:01:59 PM »

Maybe the same thing bit us both in the ass. Leatherman is doing some underhanded shit with retailers I think. I use a Gerber Multi-tool and have to replace them every five years or so. I notice they are getting harder and harder to find but the same stores sell Leatherman and knock offs. Swiss army knives are getting thinner on the ground around here as well. My perfect pocket knife would be Gerber pliers with Swiss Army knife foldouts. I don't like anything about the Leathermen, but Dragline says they are better at deflecting a bullet.

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Re: Bulk food storage, sources, and buying experiences.
« Reply #12 on: October 22, 2011, 04:04:00 PM »

Maybe the same thing bit us both in the ass. Leatherman is doing some underhanded shit with retailers I think. I use a Gerber Multi-tool and have to replace them every five years or so. I notice they are getting harder and harder to find but the same stores sell Leatherman and knock offs. Swiss army knives are getting thinner on the ground around here as well. My perfect pocket knife would be Gerber pliers with Swiss Army knife foldouts. I don't like anything about the Leathermen, but Dragline says they are better at deflecting a bullet.
I have a couple Swiss Army knives and a couple Leathermans (and knockoffs) and I gotta say the genuine leatherman is my favorite.
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alaric89

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Re: Bulk food storage, sources, and buying experiences.
« Reply #13 on: October 22, 2011, 04:34:00 PM »

I just updated myself on all three websights. I should have said "I like the slide-out pliers and inside folding locking blades type knife" (only Gerber makes them). I think the quality of machining and steel quality is best on the Swiss. I am glad you like Leatherman and if I am wrong about them manipulating retailers I am sorry, but it happens a lot in the town I work in, and I really don't like it. Yamaha manipulated the market in Northern Norway for a while. I used to love the brand 'til I found out about that.

Laetitia

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Re: Bulk food storage, sources, and buying experiences.
« Reply #14 on: October 22, 2011, 04:35:14 PM »

The way I did it was everytime I go to the grocery store, I buy two or three of everything I would normally buy just one of. Stick the other two on the shelf. That way, you know for a fact that you are buying stuff you're actually gonna use. Before you know it, you are all set without even really thinking about it.

 I hear about some people buying weird survival shit that is out of the ordinary and ask myself why they would do that. In that situation, seems you would want things to be as "normal" as possible, so storing things you already use just seemed to make the most sense to me. 

The dried fish seems like a good idea though.

I do things mostly this way, but there are staples we use a lot of - flour, oats, canned/dried milk, rice - I can save a great deal on if I can get it 10+ lbs, especially if I'm getting the premium stuff. That's where I'm hoping to find out more about storage options.

Not a survivalist, but I can see how I might lean that way if I lived farther north in a rural area. My well-stocked pantry came in handy during the week Atlanta was encased in a sheet of ice. Didn't have to participate in the pre-storm crazy shopping, and didn't worry about a thing. Three meals a day for five people, plus extra baking of cookies and loaves of bread for sandwiches when neighborhood children descended in hordes. That's the kind of emergency I prepare for. It wouldn't be tough to scale my current stock up to where it can cover a longer period.

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