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Author Topic: Magical note that allegedly scares off cops  (Read 5797 times)

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Bill Brasky

  • Guest
Re: Magical note that allegedly scares off cops
« Reply #15 on: March 19, 2006, 09:35:50 PM »

Theres no magic bullet.  Your best bet is to comply with the laws, and if you break them, face the consequences.  A cop is a cop is a cop, an "honest" cop will most likely pull you over for "honest" reasons, and his charges will probably stick.  A redneck cop is a loose cannon, and should be treated very carefully, because they enjoy kicking people in the head.  Ive argued this point before, and come to the same conclusion:  Anyone who seeks employment as a cop enjoys making people squirm, on one level or another.  Yes, there are always exceptions to the rule, but the exceptions arent the ones that are gonna kick your face in given the chance.  You make the mistake of handing such a rediculous note to the wrong cop, and you are challenging him, look out. 
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pc

  • Guest
Re: Magical note that allegedly scares off cops
« Reply #16 on: March 19, 2006, 10:59:45 PM »

I suspect that the right to remain silent bit is only for after you have been arrested.
Just a guess.

The "right to remain silent" or  "Miranda Rights," is actually only told to you by the police officer after you have been arrested.

To date there is no law that requires a person to talk to a police officer. If you do decide to talk to a police officer for whatever reason, you are doing so "voluntarily." Even on a traffic stop there's no reason for you to communicate anything to a police officer. The  Supreme Court has ruled that as long as the police do not force an individual to do something, the individual is acting voluntarily, even if a normal person would feel very intimidated and would not reasonably feel they could say no.

I think the card is great! Most traffic stops are recorded and if a cop wants to talk to you, you just become a deaf mute and hand him the card.

http://www.policecrime.com/police.html
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Bill Brasky

  • Guest
Re: Magical note that allegedly scares off cops
« Reply #17 on: March 19, 2006, 11:51:41 PM »

I keep a card in my wallet stating my Weingarten Rights.  Not nearly the same thing, but a card nonetheless.

It states:  I am now concerned that this interview could lead to discipline, or affect my personal working conditions. So, I respectfully request that a coworker of my choice be present at this meeting. Until my coworker arrives, I choose not to participate in this discussion.

Weingarten Rights
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coffeeseven

  • Guest
Re: Magical note that allegedly scares off cops
« Reply #18 on: March 20, 2006, 08:42:04 AM »


Bring on the challenge! I'm not going to fuck around and pussy-weather with these fascists. If the fascist lays a finger on me, I'm going to shoot the motherfucker. I don't fuck around with this type of scum.

I am a human being, I am not a fucking slave. I rather be cold and dead then be a fucking slave.

No one has authority over me.  NO ONE!

We'll miss you.

There are better ways to get even.
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Bill Brasky

  • Guest
Re: Magical note that allegedly scares off cops
« Reply #19 on: March 21, 2006, 09:40:03 PM »

Ya man, good luck with that. 

Humans lost most of their defensive weapons, like sharp teeth and the big horn primitive man had on his head, over a century ago.  We then doubled our brain size, and our index finger elongated, with which we can dial our lawyers number. 
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CivilianJones

  • Guest
Re: Magical note that allegedly scares off cops
« Reply #20 on: March 22, 2006, 11:30:37 AM »

Hey,
I just found the card that states my rights- though I had lost it, but I'll type it out for you guys.

Yours Rights
If you are approached by the police
(in a non-driving situation)

You should:
  • Be polite to the officer at all times.
  • DO NOT physically resist the officer, under ANY circumstances.
  • Tell the officer your name (it's a crime to give a false name).
  • NEVER offer money to a police officer.

You do not have to:
  • Stop or talk to an officer unless you are ordered to stop.
  • Show any ID like a driver's license unless you are being arrested or given a ticket.
  • Consent to any search or seizure.  If the officer threatens to get a warrant, let the officer get one.  If the officer seaarches you without a warrant, do not resist, but say that you do not consent to the search.

You do not have to:
  • Talk to the police without a lawyer present, even if you have been arrested or ticketed.
  • Stay unless you are being ticketed or arrested.  If you are not sure whether you are being ticketed or arrested, ask the officer if you are free to leave.
  • Go anywhere with the office unless you have been arrested.

Be peaceful at all times!
This information prepared by the ACLU foundation of Oregon in cooperation with the Eugene-Springfield Homless Action Coalition.

Remember:
  • Everything you say could be used against you.
  • If you want the officer to stop questioning you, ask for a lawyer.  The officer must stop questioning you at that point.  Don't keep talking and don't let the officer talk you out of wanting a lawyer.
  • You may ask the officer for his/her badge number.

So not in driving situations, but this is still good to know.
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Evenstar

  • Guest
Re: Magical note that allegedly scares off cops
« Reply #21 on: March 22, 2006, 04:07:46 PM »

Having done quite a bit of legal transcription, I am sadly dissapointed at how many cases turn into he says (the cop), she says (the citizen) especially as relates to permission to search.  Based on this informaiton, I have sent myself (via USPS) a signed, dated letter (which I have not opened and will not open unless needed) that states:

"This letter is to certify (for whatever purpose it may become necessary) that absent a signed, written statement to the contrary, I, (my name), do not give my consent to any search of my person, my home, my vehicle, or any other area that may be under my control to any individual for any reason.

"Absent a signed, written statement to the contrary, I do not waive any of my Constitutional or common law rights.  Any statement by any individual that I have agreed to orally waive my rights should be considered suspect."

I also have "I do not consent to a search" stickers at each entrance to my vehicle (below openable windows, etc.) which will be supplemented with something warning of audio/video recording as soon as I've installed that equipment.  I'm not sure if all this would work to overturn the natural Court bias to believe police officers over citizens, but it should at least give them some pause.

The mailing is needed to prove that the statement was written prior to the date on the postmark (so no one could claim I wrote it after the fact to cover my ass).  This purpose could also be served by having it notarized, I suppose, but I think the stamp cost is still slightly cheaper than a notary.

I don't plan to go out of my way to attract police attention (though there is a little voice in me DYING to fill a small pink zip-loc with talcum powder and carry it in my sock) but I want my ass covered if their malevolent gaze shifts my way.
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coffeeseven

  • Guest
Re: Magical note that allegedly scares off cops
« Reply #22 on: March 23, 2006, 08:57:38 AM »

I don't plan to go out of my way to attract police attention (though there is a little voice in me DYING to fill a small pink zip-loc with talcum powder and carry it in my sock) but I want my ass covered if their malevolent gaze shifts my way.

 :lol:
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