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LordMarius

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Bullshit conspiracy kooks
« on: September 17, 2009, 05:49:38 AM »

I'm starting to get really fed up with the crackpot conspiranoids calling in. I'm listening to the 15-09 show, and HALF the show is idiot paranoid schizophrenics calling in with their bullcrap ideas. These fuctards should seek out some help for their mental illness, not call talk shows!
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Alex Libman 15

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Re: Bullshit conspiracy kooks
« Reply #1 on: September 17, 2009, 06:42:59 AM »

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libertylover

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Re: Bullshit conspiracy kooks
« Reply #2 on: September 17, 2009, 08:46:02 AM »

http://www.sixwise.com/newsletters/07/02/28/the-9-most-shocking-conspiracy-theories-that-turned-out-to-be-true.htm
While intelligent cynicism certainly can be healthy, though, some of the greatest discoveries of all time were initially received (often with great vitriol) as blasphemous conspiracy theories -- think of the revelation that the earth was not the center of the universe, or that the world was not flat but actually round.

What follows are some of these most shocking modern conspiracy theories that were apparently right all along.

   1.      The Dreyfus Affair: In the late 1800s in France, Jewish artillery officer Alfred Dreyfus was wrongfully convicted of treason based on false government documents, and sentenced to life in prison. The French government did attempt to cover this up, but Dreyfus was eventually pardoned after the affair was made public (an act that is credited to writer Émile Zola).

   2.      The Mafia: This secret crime society was virtually unknown until the 1960s, when member Joe Valachi first revealed the society's secrets to law enforcement officials.

   3.      MK-ULTRA: In the 1950s to the 1970s, the CIA ran a mind-control project aimed at finding a "truth serum" to use on communist spies. Test subjects were given LSD and other drugs, often without consent, and some were tortured. At least one man, civilian biochemist Frank Olson, who was working for the government, died as a result of the experiments. The project was finally exposed after investigations by the Rockefeller Commission.

   4.      Operation Mockingbird: Also in the 1950s to '70s, the CIA paid a number of well-known domestic and foreign journalists (from big-name media outlets like Time, The Washington Post, The New York Times, CBS and others) to publish CIA propaganda. The CIA also reportedly funded at least one movie, the animated "Animal Farm," by George Orwell. The Church Committee finally exposed the activities in 1975.
 
  5.      Watergate: Republican officials spied on the Democratic National Headquarters from the Watergate Hotel in 1972. While conspiracy theories suggested underhanded dealings were taking place, it wasn't until 1974 that White House tape recordings linked President Nixon to the break-in and forced him to resign.

   6.      The Tuskegee Syphilis Study: The United States Public Health Service carried out this clinical study on 400 poor, African-American men with syphilis from 1932 to 1972. During the study the men were given false and sometimes dangerous treatments, and adequate treatment was intentionally withheld so the agency could learn more about the disease. While the study was initially supposed to last just six months, it continued for 40 years. Close to 200 of the men died from syphilis or related complications by the end of the study.

   7.      Operation Northwoods: In the early 1960s, American military leaders drafted plans to create public support for a war against Cuba, to oust Fidel Castro from power. The plans included committing acts of terrorism in U.S. cities, killing innocent people and U.S. soldiers, blowing up a U.S. ship, assassinating Cuban émigrés, sinking boats of Cuban refugees, and hijacking planes. The plans were all approved by the Joint Chiefs of Staff, but were reportedly rejected by the civilian leadership, then kept secret for nearly 40 years.

   8.      The Iran-Contra Affair: In 1985 and '86, the White House authorized government officials to secretly trade weapons with the Israeli government in exchange for the release of U.S. hostages in Iran. The plot was uncovered by Congress in 1987.

   9.      1990 Testimony of Nayirah: A 15-year-old girl named "Nayirah" testified before the U.S. Congress that she had seen Iraqi soldiers pulling Kuwaiti babies from incubators, causing them to die. The testimony helped gain major public support for the 1991 Gulf War, but -- despite protests that the dispute of this story was itself a conspiracy theory -- it was later discovered that the testimony was false. It was actually the creation of public relations firm Hill & Knowlton for the purpose of promoting the Gulf War.

------------------------------------

And even more recently the Madoff scandal. 
Quote
Madoff Whistleblower Went Unheeded for Years

Friday 19 December 2008
»

by: The Associated Press
Mathematical analysis in 1999 showed Madoff's returns were unreal.

    Boston - His repeated warnings that Wall Street money manager Bernard Madoff was running a giant Ponzi scheme have cast Harry Markopolos as an unheeded prophet.

    But people who know or worked with Markopolos say it wasn't prescience that helped him foresee the collapse of Madoff's alleged $50 billion fraud. Instead, they say diligence and a strong moral sense drove his quixotic, nine-year quest to alert regulators about Madoff.

    "He followed through on everything he ever did. He never let up," said his mother, Georgia Markopolos, in an interview Thursday. "Some kids just let it go if it's too hard, but he wouldn't do that." 

There are more but the point is just because you think something is a bullshit conspiracy theory it may actually have merit.   No one seems capable of critically looking at anything as soon as someone screams loudly enough it is a bullshit conspiracy theory.    Conspiracy kooks is a term thrown around like racism it is intended to shut down any debate.  The current trend is to discredit the messenger.  Some conspiracy theories are wrong but to automatically assume all conspiracies are bull is equally wrong.
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LordMarius

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Re: Bullshit conspiracy kooks
« Reply #3 on: September 17, 2009, 09:11:24 AM »

http://www.sixwise.com/newsletters/07/02/28/the-9-most-shocking-conspiracy-theories-that-turned-out-to-be-true.htm
While intelligent cynicism certainly can be healthy, though, some of the greatest discoveries of all time were initially received (often with great vitriol) as blasphemous conspiracy theories -- think of the revelation that the earth was not the center of the universe, or that the world was not flat but actually round.

What follows are some of these most shocking modern conspiracy theories that were apparently right all along.

   1.      The Dreyfus Affair: In the late 1800s in France, Jewish artillery officer Alfred Dreyfus was wrongfully convicted of treason based on false government documents, and sentenced to life in prison. The French government did attempt to cover this up, but Dreyfus was eventually pardoned after the affair was made public (an act that is credited to writer Émile Zola).

   2.      The Mafia: This secret crime society was virtually unknown until the 1960s, when member Joe Valachi first revealed the society's secrets to law enforcement officials.

   3.      MK-ULTRA: In the 1950s to the 1970s, the CIA ran a mind-control project aimed at finding a "truth serum" to use on communist spies. Test subjects were given LSD and other drugs, often without consent, and some were tortured. At least one man, civilian biochemist Frank Olson, who was working for the government, died as a result of the experiments. The project was finally exposed after investigations by the Rockefeller Commission.

   4.      Operation Mockingbird: Also in the 1950s to '70s, the CIA paid a number of well-known domestic and foreign journalists (from big-name media outlets like Time, The Washington Post, The New York Times, CBS and others) to publish CIA propaganda. The CIA also reportedly funded at least one movie, the animated "Animal Farm," by George Orwell. The Church Committee finally exposed the activities in 1975.
 
  5.      Watergate: Republican officials spied on the Democratic National Headquarters from the Watergate Hotel in 1972. While conspiracy theories suggested underhanded dealings were taking place, it wasn't until 1974 that White House tape recordings linked President Nixon to the break-in and forced him to resign.

   6.      The Tuskegee Syphilis Study: The United States Public Health Service carried out this clinical study on 400 poor, African-American men with syphilis from 1932 to 1972. During the study the men were given false and sometimes dangerous treatments, and adequate treatment was intentionally withheld so the agency could learn more about the disease. While the study was initially supposed to last just six months, it continued for 40 years. Close to 200 of the men died from syphilis or related complications by the end of the study.

   7.      Operation Northwoods: In the early 1960s, American military leaders drafted plans to create public support for a war against Cuba, to oust Fidel Castro from power. The plans included committing acts of terrorism in U.S. cities, killing innocent people and U.S. soldiers, blowing up a U.S. ship, assassinating Cuban émigrés, sinking boats of Cuban refugees, and hijacking planes. The plans were all approved by the Joint Chiefs of Staff, but were reportedly rejected by the civilian leadership, then kept secret for nearly 40 years.

   8.      The Iran-Contra Affair: In 1985 and '86, the White House authorized government officials to secretly trade weapons with the Israeli government in exchange for the release of U.S. hostages in Iran. The plot was uncovered by Congress in 1987.

   9.      1990 Testimony of Nayirah: A 15-year-old girl named "Nayirah" testified before the U.S. Congress that she had seen Iraqi soldiers pulling Kuwaiti babies from incubators, causing them to die. The testimony helped gain major public support for the 1991 Gulf War, but -- despite protests that the dispute of this story was itself a conspiracy theory -- it was later discovered that the testimony was false. It was actually the creation of public relations firm Hill & Knowlton for the purpose of promoting the Gulf War.

------------------------------------

And even more recently the Madoff scandal. 
Quote
Madoff Whistleblower Went Unheeded for Years

Friday 19 December 2008
»

by: The Associated Press
Mathematical analysis in 1999 showed Madoff's returns were unreal.

    Boston - His repeated warnings that Wall Street money manager Bernard Madoff was running a giant Ponzi scheme have cast Harry Markopolos as an unheeded prophet.

    But people who know or worked with Markopolos say it wasn't prescience that helped him foresee the collapse of Madoff's alleged $50 billion fraud. Instead, they say diligence and a strong moral sense drove his quixotic, nine-year quest to alert regulators about Madoff.

    "He followed through on everything he ever did. He never let up," said his mother, Georgia Markopolos, in an interview Thursday. "Some kids just let it go if it's too hard, but he wouldn't do that." 

There are more but the point is just because you think something is a bullshit conspiracy theory it may actually have merit.   No one seems capable of critically looking at anything as soon as someone screams loudly enough it is a bullshit conspiracy theory.    Conspiracy kooks is a term thrown around like racism it is intended to shut down any debate.  The current trend is to discredit the messenger.  Some conspiracy theories are wrong but to automatically assume all conspiracies are bull is equally wrong.


That's all good and well, but it does not by association magic all paranoid delutions true. Sometimes a spoon is just a spoon.
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libertylover

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Re: Bullshit conspiracy kooks
« Reply #4 on: September 17, 2009, 12:43:33 PM »

That's all good and well, but it does not by association magic all paranoid delutions true. Sometimes a spoon is just a spoon.

Equally just because some people point to a conspiracy and are wrong does not by association magic make all paranoid delutions that conspiracies don't exist true either.  Sometimes people lie for personal gain and perpetrate fraud. 
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LordMarius

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Re: Bullshit conspiracy kooks
« Reply #5 on: September 17, 2009, 01:30:17 PM »

That's all good and well, but it does not by association magic all paranoid delutions true. Sometimes a spoon is just a spoon.

Equally just because some people point to a conspiracy and are wrong does not by association magic make all paranoid delutions that conspiracies don't exist true either.  Sometimes people lie for personal gain and perpetrate fraud. 

My point is: Look at the damn evidence! Vaccines do NOT cause autism! The science is real damn clear!  The twin towers were taken down with planes! FEMA has no intentions of putting you in a concentration camps! Water is not added fluoride to kill you! There are no damn chemtrails! There's no damn NWO! God damn, I'm tired of this crap, stop chasing these fucking ghosts, the whole liberty movement is ridiculed because of you fucktards!
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Diogenes The Cynic

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Re: Bullshit conspiracy kooks
« Reply #6 on: September 17, 2009, 03:27:32 PM »

That's all good and well, but it does not by association magic all paranoid delutions true. Sometimes a spoon is just a spoon.

Equally just because some people point to a conspiracy and are wrong does not by association magic make all paranoid delutions that conspiracies don't exist true either.  Sometimes people lie for personal gain and perpetrate fraud. 

My point is: Look at the damn evidence! Vaccines do NOT cause autism! The science is real damn clear!  The twin towers were taken down with planes! FEMA has no intentions of putting you in a concentration camps! Water is not added fluoride to kill you! There are no damn chemtrails! There's no damn NWO! God damn, I'm tired of this crap, stop chasing these fucking ghosts, the whole liberty movement is ridiculed because of you fucktards!

Why cant you accept the truth?
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Dude, I thought you were a spambot for like a week. You posted like a spambot. You failed the Turing test.

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LordMarius

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Re: Bullshit conspiracy kooks
« Reply #7 on: September 17, 2009, 03:54:40 PM »

That's all good and well, but it does not by association magic all paranoid delutions true. Sometimes a spoon is just a spoon.

Equally just because some people point to a conspiracy and are wrong does not by association magic make all paranoid delutions that conspiracies don't exist true either.  Sometimes people lie for personal gain and perpetrate fraud. 

My point is: Look at the damn evidence! Vaccines do NOT cause autism! The science is real damn clear!  The twin towers were taken down with planes! FEMA has no intentions of putting you in a concentration camps! Water is not added fluoride to kill you! There are no damn chemtrails! There's no damn NWO! God damn, I'm tired of this crap, stop chasing these fucking ghosts, the whole liberty movement is ridiculed because of you fucktards!

Why cant you accept the truth?

What truth?
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Alex Libman 15

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Re: Bullshit conspiracy kooks
« Reply #8 on: September 17, 2009, 04:03:02 PM »

My point is: Look at the damn evidence! Vaccines do NOT cause autism!

Even if they don't, making them mandatory is still an egregious use of government force that must be opposed.


The science is real damn clear!  The twin towers were taken down with planes!

The most plausible 9/11 conspiracy theories only involve brainwashed patsies (who may have been aided by hydraulic hardware hacks for auto-piloting the planes), and thus they are not disprovable. But, regardless of that, 9/11 was clearly a case of failure of government-forced monopolies -- diplomacy, military, intelligence, airspace defense, airport / airline regulation, gun control, building standards certification, etc, etc, etc -- which was later used to justify more government power.


FEMA has no intentions of putting you in a concentration camps!

Oh, good, then I'm safe in knowing that I'll be in the concentration camp for tax resisters instead.  :roll:


Water is not added fluoride to kill you!

I don't think anyone is alleging instant death from fluoride, it's mostly an issue of water-related government regulations stifling local alternatives.


There's no damn NWO!

There's no "old world order" either - the state of the world is in perpetual transition.  "NWO" is used as a catch-all phrase for undesirable future government changes, many of which are very much plausible, including greater expansion of government power through new regional and global bureaucracies, environmentalist insanity, China-style population control, and so on.
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libertylover

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Re: Bullshit conspiracy kooks
« Reply #9 on: September 17, 2009, 04:44:27 PM »

That's all good and well, but it does not by association magic all paranoid delutions true. Sometimes a spoon is just a spoon.

Equally just because some people point to a conspiracy and are wrong does not by association magic make all paranoid delutions that conspiracies don't exist true either.  Sometimes people lie for personal gain and perpetrate fraud.  

My point is: Look at the damn evidence! Vaccines do NOT cause autism! The science is real damn clear!  The twin towers were taken down with planes! FEMA has no intentions of putting you in a concentration camps! Water is not added fluoride to kill you! There are no damn chemtrails! There's no damn NWO! God damn, I'm tired of this crap, stop chasing these fucking ghosts, the whole liberty movement is ridiculed because of you fucktards!

No the science isn't clear.  All the studies which say vaccines are not a possible factor are done by people with major credibility issues and conflicts of interest.  Stop trying to attach all these separate issues together as though they are one item.  They are not.  Why, didn't you throw in a belief in bigfoot and ufos while you are attempting to discredit concerns about toxins in vaccines?   God damn, I'm tired of this crap of people attaching crazy ass theories to verifiable evidence of potential wrong doing.  Just because there is no chemtrails doesn't mean that vaccines could not be a factor in the rise in autism rates.   They are totally unrelated issues.

On the fluoride debate you totally missed the point on that one as well.  Fluoride is an aluminum industrial pollutant which was going to be very expensive to dispose of and those manufacturers were faced with lawsuits from employees who developed fluorosis and eventually bone cancer.  So as to avoid potential liability these companies had to find a way to make fluoride appear harmless and dispose of it at the same time.  They paid for scientist to sell to the public the supposed benefits of adding fluoride to public water systems.   They also paid to discredit any scientist who indicated that taking fluoride internally isn't the same thing as applying it topically.  Or scientist that pointed out to the public there is a difference between aluminum fluoride an industrial by product and calcium fluoride a natural substance.  Calcium fluoride is the one which was used in the study to shown if applied topically could decrease cavities and not aluminum fluoride.  You should note people don't drink sunscreen to prevent skin cancer.

I suppose you think Marijuana was made illegal because it is an evil harmful drug which causes people to become axe murders.  That it is only conspiracy nuts who think that the war on Marijuana was done to make nylon and paper more profitable.  There is no validity to the charges that Andrew Mellon, Hoover's Secretary of the Treasury and Dupont's primary investor had a vested interest to see to it that Hemp was made illegal.  So when he appointed his future nephew-in-law, Harry J. Anslinger, to head the Federal Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs it wasn't with the intent of making hemp illegal.  Hearst's newspapers ran stories emphasizing the horrors of marijuana not because he had interests in paper manufacturing whose profits might be hurt by Hemp.  He sincerely represented the true dangers of Marijuana to his readers.   And Marijuana really is responsible for everything from car accidents to loose morality.  Oh, glorious day you saved me from thinking that people in the business with conflicts of interests really only have the public's' interest at heart when they manipulate government officials.
« Last Edit: September 17, 2009, 04:54:43 PM by libertylover »
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Diogenes The Cynic

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Re: Bullshit conspiracy kooks
« Reply #10 on: September 17, 2009, 05:22:21 PM »

That's all good and well, but it does not by association magic all paranoid delutions true. Sometimes a spoon is just a spoon.

Equally just because some people point to a conspiracy and are wrong does not by association magic make all paranoid delutions that conspiracies don't exist true either.  Sometimes people lie for personal gain and perpetrate fraud. 

My point is: Look at the damn evidence! Vaccines do NOT cause autism! The science is real damn clear!  The twin towers were taken down with planes! FEMA has no intentions of putting you in a concentration camps! Water is not added fluoride to kill you! There are no damn chemtrails! There's no damn NWO! God damn, I'm tired of this crap, stop chasing these fucking ghosts, the whole liberty movement is ridiculed because of you fucktards!

Why cant you accept the truth?

What truth?

Im messing with you
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Dude, I thought you were a spambot for like a week. You posted like a spambot. You failed the Turing test.

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Terror Australis

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Re: Bullshit conspiracy kooks
« Reply #11 on: September 17, 2009, 07:17:41 PM »

You forgot the biggest conspiracy of all...the legitimacy of the state.This one alone has caused unimaginable human suffering throughout history,and lays the groundwork for most of the other conspiracy theories.Can you really blame people for being suspicious of those in power who feel it is their birthright to subjugate humanity?


It will be those who are skeptical of men in power who will be the ones defending the last vestige of resistance.
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IndyCA

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Re: Bullshit conspiracy kooks
« Reply #12 on: September 17, 2009, 08:01:58 PM »

http://www.sixwise.com/newsletters/07/02/28/the-9-most-shocking-conspiracy-theories-that-turned-out-to-be-true.htm
While intelligent cynicism certainly can be healthy, though, some of the greatest discoveries of all time were initially received (often with great vitriol) as blasphemous conspiracy theories -- think of the revelation that the earth was not the center of the universe, or that the world was not flat but actually round.

What follows are some of these most shocking modern conspiracy theories that were apparently right all along.

   1.      The Dreyfus Affair: In the late 1800s in France, Jewish artillery officer Alfred Dreyfus was wrongfully convicted of treason based on false government documents, and sentenced to life in prison. The French government did attempt to cover this up, but Dreyfus was eventually pardoned after the affair was made public (an act that is credited to writer Émile Zola).

   2.      The Mafia: This secret crime society was virtually unknown until the 1960s, when member Joe Valachi first revealed the society's secrets to law enforcement officials.

   3.      MK-ULTRA: In the 1950s to the 1970s, the CIA ran a mind-control project aimed at finding a "truth serum" to use on communist spies. Test subjects were given LSD and other drugs, often without consent, and some were tortured. At least one man, civilian biochemist Frank Olson, who was working for the government, died as a result of the experiments. The project was finally exposed after investigations by the Rockefeller Commission.

   4.      Operation Mockingbird: Also in the 1950s to '70s, the CIA paid a number of well-known domestic and foreign journalists (from big-name media outlets like Time, The Washington Post, The New York Times, CBS and others) to publish CIA propaganda. The CIA also reportedly funded at least one movie, the animated "Animal Farm," by George Orwell. The Church Committee finally exposed the activities in 1975.
 
  5.      Watergate: Republican officials spied on the Democratic National Headquarters from the Watergate Hotel in 1972. While conspiracy theories suggested underhanded dealings were taking place, it wasn't until 1974 that White House tape recordings linked President Nixon to the break-in and forced him to resign.

   6.      The Tuskegee Syphilis Study: The United States Public Health Service carried out this clinical study on 400 poor, African-American men with syphilis from 1932 to 1972. During the study the men were given false and sometimes dangerous treatments, and adequate treatment was intentionally withheld so the agency could learn more about the disease. While the study was initially supposed to last just six months, it continued for 40 years. Close to 200 of the men died from syphilis or related complications by the end of the study.

   7.      Operation Northwoods: In the early 1960s, American military leaders drafted plans to create public support for a war against Cuba, to oust Fidel Castro from power. The plans included committing acts of terrorism in U.S. cities, killing innocent people and U.S. soldiers, blowing up a U.S. ship, assassinating Cuban émigrés, sinking boats of Cuban refugees, and hijacking planes. The plans were all approved by the Joint Chiefs of Staff, but were reportedly rejected by the civilian leadership, then kept secret for nearly 40 years.

   8.      The Iran-Contra Affair: In 1985 and '86, the White House authorized government officials to secretly trade weapons with the Israeli government in exchange for the release of U.S. hostages in Iran. The plot was uncovered by Congress in 1987.

   9.      1990 Testimony of Nayirah: A 15-year-old girl named "Nayirah" testified before the U.S. Congress that she had seen Iraqi soldiers pulling Kuwaiti babies from incubators, causing them to die. The testimony helped gain major public support for the 1991 Gulf War, but -- despite protests that the dispute of this story was itself a conspiracy theory -- it was later discovered that the testimony was false. It was actually the creation of public relations firm Hill & Knowlton for the purpose of promoting the Gulf War.

------------------------------------

And even more recently the Madoff scandal. 
Quote
Madoff Whistleblower Went Unheeded for Years

Friday 19 December 2008
»

by: The Associated Press
Mathematical analysis in 1999 showed Madoff's returns were unreal.

    Boston - His repeated warnings that Wall Street money manager Bernard Madoff was running a giant Ponzi scheme have cast Harry Markopolos as an unheeded prophet.

    But people who know or worked with Markopolos say it wasn't prescience that helped him foresee the collapse of Madoff's alleged $50 billion fraud. Instead, they say diligence and a strong moral sense drove his quixotic, nine-year quest to alert regulators about Madoff.

    "He followed through on everything he ever did. He never let up," said his mother, Georgia Markopolos, in an interview Thursday. "Some kids just let it go if it's too hard, but he wouldn't do that." 

There are more but the point is just because you think something is a bullshit conspiracy theory it may actually have merit.   No one seems capable of critically looking at anything as soon as someone screams loudly enough it is a bullshit conspiracy theory.    Conspiracy kooks is a term thrown around like racism it is intended to shut down any debate.  The current trend is to discredit the messenger.  Some conspiracy theories are wrong but to automatically assume all conspiracies are bull is equally wrong.

I think a lot of the conspiracy theories about Reagan are beginning to solidify in fact.  His connection with Bin Laden and terror groups, CIA drug smuggling and distribution in US, making crack more illegal than cocaine based on racism, and of course you already mentioned Iran-Contras.  Reagan was a tyrant and I don't see why the conservatives and even some libertarians hold him is such high esteem.
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Bill Brasky

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Re: Bullshit conspiracy kooks
« Reply #13 on: September 17, 2009, 11:12:18 PM »

That's all good and well, but it does not by association magic all paranoid delutions true. Sometimes a spoon is just a spoon.

Equally just because some people point to a conspiracy and are wrong does not by association magic make all paranoid delutions that conspiracies don't exist true either.  Sometimes people lie for personal gain and perpetrate fraud.  

My point is: Look at the damn evidence! Vaccines do NOT cause autism! The science is real damn clear!  The twin towers were taken down with planes! FEMA has no intentions of putting you in a concentration camps! Water is not added fluoride to kill you! There are no damn chemtrails! There's no damn NWO! God damn, I'm tired of this crap, stop chasing these fucking ghosts, the whole liberty movement is ridiculed because of you fucktards!

No the science isn't clear.  All the studies which say vaccines are not a possible factor are done by people with major credibility issues and conflicts of interest.  Stop trying to attach all these separate issues together as though they are one item.  They are not.  Why, didn't you throw in a belief in bigfoot and ufos while you are attempting to discredit concerns about toxins in vaccines?   God damn, I'm tired of this crap of people attaching crazy ass theories to verifiable evidence of potential wrong doing.  Just because there is no chemtrails doesn't mean that vaccines could not be a factor in the rise in autism rates.   They are totally unrelated issues.

On the fluoride debate you totally missed the point on that one as well.  Fluoride is an aluminum industrial pollutant which was going to be very expensive to dispose of and those manufacturers were faced with lawsuits from employees who developed fluorosis and eventually bone cancer.  So as to avoid potential liability these companies had to find a way to make fluoride appear harmless and dispose of it at the same time.  They paid for scientist to sell to the public the supposed benefits of adding fluoride to public water systems.   They also paid to discredit any scientist who indicated that taking fluoride internally isn't the same thing as applying it topically.  Or scientist that pointed out to the public there is a difference between aluminum fluoride an industrial by product and calcium fluoride a natural substance.  Calcium fluoride is the one which was used in the study to shown if applied topically could decrease cavities and not aluminum fluoride.  You should note people don't drink sunscreen to prevent skin cancer.

I suppose you think Marijuana was made illegal because it is an evil harmful drug which causes people to become axe murders.  That it is only conspiracy nuts who think that the war on Marijuana was done to make nylon and paper more profitable.  There is no validity to the charges that Andrew Mellon, Hoover's Secretary of the Treasury and Dupont's primary investor had a vested interest to see to it that Hemp was made illegal.  So when he appointed his future nephew-in-law, Harry J. Anslinger, to head the Federal Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs it wasn't with the intent of making hemp illegal.  Hearst's newspapers ran stories emphasizing the horrors of marijuana not because he had interests in paper manufacturing whose profits might be hurt by Hemp.  He sincerely represented the true dangers of Marijuana to his readers.   And Marijuana really is responsible for everything from car accidents to loose morality.  Oh, glorious day you saved me from thinking that people in the business with conflicts of interests really only have the public's' interest at heart when they manipulate government officials.

Put my seal on this and have it dispatched immediately!



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Re: Bullshit conspiracy kooks
« Reply #14 on: September 17, 2009, 11:51:33 PM »

Sure, some conspiracies turn out to be true. But the thing is, you need some actual evidence to substantiate the story. The vague, easily falsifiable crap spun out by folks such as the 9-11 "truthers" does not do anything to validate their paranoid ideas. "Some guy says that he thinks he might have seen what appeared to be metal in the basement" does not constitute evidence. Nor do obvious absurdieties, such as the claim that steel can't melt, cell phones don't work in airplanes, and other such nonsense.
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