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Author Topic: Boats  (Read 40116 times)

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Bill Brasky

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Re: Boats
« Reply #15 on: November 22, 2009, 03:25:24 PM »

People who mention the "middle of the ocean" don't have the slightest clue what this is all about.  Being an hour from shore is the middle of the ocean in these terms.  Your fuel tanks won't take you that far.  You normally have a range of 300-400 NM in a straight line, so you shouldn't go out more than a third of that.  The rule is 1/3 tank out, 1/3 tank back, and 1/3 for reserve in case something happens.  Pleasure cruising takes you into the Florida Keys and places like that, where you can anchor. 
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Bill Brasky

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Re: Boats
« Reply #16 on: November 22, 2009, 04:03:20 PM »

This is a 1961 Huckins Linwood Flybridge.  Slightly over 50ft long, this is a little bigger than I'd be comfortable with.  But she's a beauty.  $89k, well taken care of, overhauled engines (Detroit Diesels), new electronics, and has three staterooms.  Her name is Dry Martini.  She's been for sale for over a year.  I was hoping to find this listing again so I could post it here. 











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Rillion

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Re: Boats
« Reply #17 on: November 22, 2009, 04:21:48 PM »

This is a 1961 Huckins Linwood Flybridge.  Slightly over 50ft long, this is a little bigger than I'd be comfortable with.  But she's a beauty.  $89k, well taken care of, overhauled engines (Detroit Diesels), new electronics, and has three staterooms.  Her name is Dry Martini.  She's been for sale for over a year.  I was hoping to find this listing again so I could post it here.  

Aqui.

Looks nice (especially the full-size fridge), except.....well, two sets of bunk beds.  
« Last Edit: November 22, 2009, 04:27:24 PM by Rillion »
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Bill Brasky

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Re: Boats
« Reply #18 on: November 22, 2009, 05:13:36 PM »

This one is really interesting to me, its a 53ft Bluewater Coastal Cruiser.  In the boating world, these are the gay pink Schwinn nobody wants, they are viewed with disdain among boat enthusiasts.  They're a hybrid houseboat-yacht and are designed to be operated by people who don't know jack-shit about boating.  Perfect for me. 

They don't handle rough seas very well, with the low bow deadrise (deadrise is the distance from the point of the deck to the waterline) and a shallow draft.  Hence the term "coastal cruiser" you aren't supposed to tackle the rough stuff with them.  That doesn't make them unsafe, in fact the manufacturer says to the best of their knowledge, not one Bluewater has ever been sunk in a storm.  They are considered bulletproof in nautical terms, which is maybe why the boat enthusiasts don't like them.  Boat people like the possibility of idiots sinking their boats, I guess. 

Anyway, the hull design is very fuel efficient in terms of drag coefficient, and with the shallow draft they plane at relatively low speeds.  They're great for gunk-holing and can go just about anywhere.  They're actually designed to be beached.  Another interesting feature in this hull design is prop pockets, which prevents damage and allows for navigation in very shallow water.  You only need 2 ft of water to move, and hitting a sand bar is not a big deal.  I saw a review where the operator was purposely hauling ass through a low-tide area, skipping over sand bars that would kill a normal boat.  Thats pretty cool from a survivalist perspective. 

They use a lot of plastic and fiberglass to prevent a lot of the cosmetic maintenance issues that plague boats with exterior wood.  Basically, they're a floating Winnebago.  Regular gasoline engines are a minor drawback, I'd prefer diesel power.  Diesel engines last much longer in these large boats, gasoline engines tend to burn up quicker, but they're also cheaper to replace or repair. 

I think they're cool.  You can find them for $50k if you look around, $75k on average.  Brand new they are $300-$400k and up. 



















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BonerJoe

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Re: Boats
« Reply #19 on: November 22, 2009, 05:19:08 PM »

God, now I'm horny for a boat.
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Bill Brasky

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Re: Boats
« Reply #20 on: November 22, 2009, 05:32:30 PM »

God, now I'm horny for a boat.

I think it'd be perfect for you.  You don't mind solitude, you like to explore different places and travel, and have the right personality for coexisting among the kind of people who make their life in the pirate-y world of marinas.  Those people don't like to be fucked with, and more often than not have a world-view that is in basic agreement with ours.  (although many are ex-military, and have a big hard-on for the flag.  You find a lot of squids in the docks)
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Bill Brasky

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Re: Boats
« Reply #21 on: November 22, 2009, 05:46:46 PM »

This is a 1961 Huckins Linwood Flybridge.  Slightly over 50ft long, this is a little bigger than I'd be comfortable with.  But she's a beauty.  $89k, well taken care of, overhauled engines (Detroit Diesels), new electronics, and has three staterooms.  Her name is Dry Martini.  She's been for sale for over a year.  I was hoping to find this listing again so I could post it here.  

Aqui.

Looks nice (especially the full-size fridge), except.....well, two sets of bunk beds.  

Ya, thats where I found her. 

They do the bunk bed thing often.  Martini has a master stateroom, those are for guests.  I'd probably tear one apart and make a larder/storage.  The other thing you see is a twin-bed setup, side by side rather than a double bed.  It reminds me of old-time sitcoms where they couldn't show two people in the same bed. 
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Rillion

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Re: Boats
« Reply #22 on: November 22, 2009, 05:55:38 PM »

Ya, thats where I found her. 

They do the bunk bed thing often.  Martini has a master stateroom, those are for guests.  I'd probably tear one apart and make a larder/storage.  The other thing you see is a twin-bed setup, side by side rather than a double bed.  It reminds me of old-time sitcoms where they couldn't show two people in the same bed. 

  = bunk bed!
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BonerJoe

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Re: Boats
« Reply #23 on: November 22, 2009, 06:40:27 PM »

If the guests don't like the bunk beds, then they can get their own fuckin' boat.
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Bill Brasky

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Re: Boats
« Reply #24 on: November 22, 2009, 08:18:59 PM »

Ya, thats where I found her. 

They do the bunk bed thing often.  Martini has a master stateroom, those are for guests.  I'd probably tear one apart and make a larder/storage.  The other thing you see is a twin-bed setup, side by side rather than a double bed.  It reminds me of old-time sitcoms where they couldn't show two people in the same bed. 

  = bunk bed!

Dis is not de master stateroom, mademoiselle.  Close the door on these unfortunate accommodations, and proceed down the hall to more dignified quarters.  (Martini, she is the sensitive.  We do not laugh at her shortcomings.)
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Bill Brasky

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Re: Boats
« Reply #25 on: November 22, 2009, 08:22:32 PM »

If the guests don't like the bunk beds, then they can get their own fuckin' boat.

Yargh, thats the spirit!
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Rillion

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Re: Boats
« Reply #26 on: November 22, 2009, 08:41:09 PM »

Dis is not de master stateroom, mademoiselle.  Close the door on these unfortunate accommodations, and proceed down the hall to more dignified quarters.  (Martini, she is the sensitive.  We do not laugh at her shortcomings.)

Bunk bed.  BUNK BED!  :lol:  

I've looked at quite a few boats today out of pure curiosity, and all of the ones between 38-50 foot or so seem to have three bedrooms.  Seems like a waste of space to me.  One spare bedroom is fine, and why not make any extra a double or a queen bed?  If it's a bunk bed, might as well rip that shit out and use the space for a library or something.  

De master stateroom, well....might as well be all Star Trek, like dis:

(Lagoon catamaran 440)

Eet doesn't have to be like dis:

(Hatteras 72 motor yacht)


« Last Edit: November 22, 2009, 08:47:48 PM by Rillion »
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Bill Brasky

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Re: Boats
« Reply #27 on: November 22, 2009, 09:56:07 PM »


I've looked at quite a few boats today out of pure curiosity, and all of the ones between 38-50 foot or so seem to have three bedrooms.  Seems like a waste of space to me.  One spare bedroom is fine, and why not make any extra a double or a queen bed?  If it's a bunk bed, might as well rip that shit out and use the space for a library or something.  



Usually, the way the original buyer specified it is the way it stays.  Theres a few things to consider when you're spending big money, and more than not, its a guy with a wife and kids.  Everybody needs a bed.  The kids bring a friend, or the wife wants to take her sister, that sort of thing.  You end up with a lot of beds if the salesman knows his craft and works on the floorplan with the buyer. 

Personally I'd rip that shit out and make an office or larder, but I'm single.  My kids would dig the thing, and they'd be fine with some kind of funky rig with the crisscrossed bunks.  So the third room would be nixed in a hurry.  Theres always the couch for a guest, my kind of people are not the fussy sort. 

The other consideration I've run into is docking fees, they go by length.  If you want to keep your living costs reasonable, you need to keep it under the 45ft range because after that, the dock fees get pricey.  They move you to another part of the marina where the docks are longer, longer length means less boats fit into an area.  You get whacked for that.  And since bigger boats use more juice, the electrical hook-up fees are more.  Usually they don't meter the juice, and just charge a flat fee.  Everything is more expensive at the longer slips. 

The alternative is a mooring ball, in a mooring field.  Thats where you see a bunch of boats all tied up out in the middle of the water in rows.  I wouldn't mind that, but you can't simply walk away, you gotta use a little dinghy to get ashore.  You gotta provide your own electricity out there, usually with a windmill to augment your batteries, so the genny doesn't kick on all the time.  Mooring balls cost about $300 a month, and a lot less per year.  Docking is around $600 a month, or $4,500 a year.  Theres a few other fees, and some stuff is included like water and pump-out, and sometimes not. 

To keep it cheaper, you can go way way up-river into bumfuck, Egypt.  Theres still a lot of boats up there, but its more local boys, not the ritzy mega-boats.  The fancy-pants crowd doesn't want to spend three hours getting to open blue.  I'd rather be up there anyways, more my kind of people, more protection from high winds that come off the seas. 
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Bill Brasky

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Re: Boats
« Reply #28 on: November 23, 2009, 04:14:57 AM »

Complete set-up for power generation.  

In boats you normally have a generator which provides off-shore power when you're tied out at anchor or a mooring ball.  Gen-sets are ridiculously expensive to replace, and burn fuel.  Its not as simple as buying one of those generators you see on construction sites.  I thought it was at first, and quickly learned different.  

RV and Marine gensets are a whole 'nother ballgame.  A complete replacement of a genset can cost as much as $10,000, you could possibly shop it around and get a bargain for $5k.  I was shocked.  A marine genset is the equivalent of the furnace in your house.  Theres a few name brands that continually surface.  Onan, Westerbeke, Kohler.  Northern Lights is supposed to be top shelf, and supposedly lasts twice as long - somehow. [citation needed-lol]  The fuel they burn is necessarily the same fuel as your engines, they draw from the fuel tank.  You don't want to fuckaround with propane genny and gas engine, it just makes things more difficult.  

They kick on and off and power the battery bank, and you draw the power from the batteries.  So when the batteries run low, the genny kicks on and charges the batts, then kicks off.  All your electric stuff runs from this.  Refrigerator is the biggest power drain, air conditioning is optional but nice to have.  Plus, you've got your computer, nav systems, microwave, television, coffee maker, lights, water pump, all that jazz.  

Quick elaboration on the batteries - you typically have maybe six batteries, deep cycle marine batteries are about the size of a cinderblock and are wired in a row.  You can add to that row, they cost about $200 each.  I need to look more deeper into the battery thing, but its a non-issue.  They're basically the same as the batteries you'll use in solar house stuff.  Big fuckers, heavy, and they're not cheap, but they're not hideously expensive either.  You swap them out when they get lazy, and they last a good while in recharging cycles.  Most boats would have good batteries if you made a wise purchase and the previous owner took good care of his shit.  

If your generator dies, you are fucked.  Bigtime.  They have hour meters on them, and require maintenance.  Once your genny reaches so-many-thousand hours, you're living on borrowed time.  In an average day, it may run several hours depending on your electrical consumption.  If you're tied to a mooring ball for a year, this is gonna add up to a lot of hours.  Figuring 1gph fuel burn, 2 hours a day, thats 700 gallons in a year.  At three bucks a gallon, you're talking $2,100.  This is probably a very low low estimate.  And thats just fuel, nevermind if the thing shits the bed.  

You want to provide energy into the batteries to prevent the generator from kicking on as much as possible.  You can't escape the necessity of a generator.  But you can prolong its life.  Theoretically you can introduce energy into the batteries and the generator will never kick on, until you run it for testing purposes to keep it fresh and prevent it from getting gummed up like all engines.  

Heres how --



In one year, you will be completely energy independent if living off-shore.  Unless you want to drive the boat around.  Solar/wind hybrid kits are preferable to exclusive dependence on either method.  Solar in itself is only efficient when the sun shines, which excludes at least half the day, and some days you get none.  Wind often dies down, and windmills have kick-in speeds.  Reliance on one is problematic, and tying into your system is a project.  The dual-kits make the most sense to me, and they're designed to achieve that balance by green-power geeks, so I would defer to their area of expertise.  
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davann

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Re: Boats
« Reply #29 on: November 23, 2009, 11:37:07 AM »

Solar in itself is only efficient when the sun shines, which excludes at least half the day, and some days you get none.  Wind often dies down, and windmills have kick-in speeds.  Reliance on one is problematic, and tying into your system is a project.  The dual-kits make the most sense to me, and they're designed to achieve that balance by green-power geeks, so I would defer to their area of expertise.  


Years ago I think it was 60 minutes that ran a story of this family that was living off bicycle power. They hooked a couple of those stationary exercises bikes to batteries and the whole family pedaled away to charge the batteries. They also used solar and wind I believe. It seems odd this concept never gets mentioned in the age of green. I wonder how much power a vigorous exercise routine would generate. It seems a waste to go through the pain of a spin routine and all that energy is wasted.

I love the idea of a boat for the SHTF scenarios and for just getting off the grid.  With a cabin in the woods there will always be property taxes. For those that wish to get as far away from as many taxes they can this seems the best option. Granted, paying docking fees will contribute to taxes in part but it will be third hand. For principled people this might be enough of a distance.
« Last Edit: November 23, 2009, 02:25:15 PM by davann »
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