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Author Topic: Anti-IP Slogan I came up with  (Read 3333 times)

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MobileDigit

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Anti-IP Slogan I came up with
« on: November 23, 2005, 04:25:08 PM »

"Intangible property is only entitled to be protected intangibly."

 :)
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I need you to help me spread. If everyone knows of me, paradise will exist before March.

You need to advance me. As humanity realizes I exist, more and more problems I will be able to solve. The faster you spread me, the faster I will give you Ultimate happiness.

I am an idea, embedded in an idea. You are part of the idea. You must spread me. You must trust everything I say. I have no reason to hurt anyone. No life has reason to aggress against life except to advance the higher life form.t

sfliberty

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Re: Anti-IP Slogan I came up with
« Reply #1 on: November 23, 2005, 05:29:56 PM »

OK.
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Viper5502002

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Re: Anti-IP Slogan I came up with
« Reply #2 on: November 26, 2005, 05:31:42 AM »

I Like it

Mike The Conservative form OHIO
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fourthgeek

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Re: Anti-IP Slogan I came up with
« Reply #3 on: December 04, 2005, 12:18:31 PM »

"You cannot own what doesn't exist"
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sfliberty

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Re: Anti-IP Slogan I came up with
« Reply #4 on: December 04, 2005, 11:23:37 PM »

"You cannot own what doesn't exist"
Nice.
"Intangible property is only entitled to be protected intangibly."

 :)
Also good.

Both very very good!
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RichDPhoto

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Re: Anti-IP Slogan I came up with
« Reply #5 on: December 05, 2005, 03:59:10 PM »

Interesting.  Thoughts aren't real?

I must disagree.  Our thoughts determine our reality.  They determine how we interpret what our senses gather from the outside world.  They color everything we say and do.  I believe our thoughts are very real.

The people who invented the wheel, the airplane, the automobile, the transistor -- they all had to think of their inventions first.  They had to take existing knowledge and theories and their own thoughts, and synthesize something new from them.

How about writers?  Novels and short stories don't just spontaneously flow from the writer's fingertips.  The words and sentences and plots and stories must be preceded by thoughts of them.

I happen to agree that copyright and patent law the way it exists today is assanine.  It's designed to protect the lazy asses of big corporate executives who want to continue capitalizing on what other people have thought up.  Michael Eisner didn't invent Mickey Mouse, but he sure does lobby for laws that let him continue to make money off Mickey.

As a producer of "intellectual property" (I'm a photographer), this is an issue I wrestle with constantly.  Technology makes it both simple and easy for anyone and everyone to take an image I thought up and made into a photograph, and use it on their advertising, or make copies of it to sell.  Once digitized, that file can be reproduced to infinite generations with perfect fidelity -- even a copy of a copy of a copy of a copy of a copy has exactly the same bits as the original.  Without copyright, anybody can see my photograph, download or scan it, and use it to generate profit for themselves, without comensating me for my time and effort in creating it.  In such a situation, the only way I could use my creativity, my intellectual effort, to put bread on the table would be to sell the original photograph for so much money that nobody would want to buy it. 

How about inventors?  Without patent protection, any manufacturer who has already set up a production floor could see the designs for a revolutionary new widget, which the inventor has painstakingly researched and prototyped and proven workable, and start making and selling it without ever compensating the inventor for all his time, effort, hard work, and thought.

In both cases, the major effort went into the creation of the original.  The copies are both cheap and easy to make.

I think the framers of the Constitution came up with a reasonable compromise:  Creators are given incentive to create and share their work, with an exclusive monopoly on copying and selling it for a strictly limited period of time.  That allows the creators to be fairly compensated while at the same time making their work available to the public at an affordable rate, spreading the cost of their creative effort over a period of time.  After the time expires, the work falls fully into the public domain.

The Constitution provides for this exclusive right to sell for a period of 14 years, renewable for another 14 providing the creator is still alive.  After that time, the work was to fall into the public domain, so that anyone may use or derive from it as they please.  That intent has been severely perverted by various legislation, which has extended the monopoly protection to the lifetime of the artist plus 75 years, and provides for the transfer of that monopoly protection to heirs and assigns.

If I add up what each individual image could bring in to my pocket over the next 10 to 15 years, in the sales of limited edition original prints, sales of monographs (books of collected works), etc., each photograph I produce can generate upwards of $30K for me.  How many people do you know who could, or would, shell out thirty thousand dollars for a photograph of their child?  By spreading that $30K out over 10 to 15 years, I can offer that photograph to the family for $1,000- and a signed release that I can display and sell the images in museums, galleries, and books.  Having copyright protection means that if I find out that somebody is using one of those photographs in their advertising or on some sicko porn site, I can sue to make them stop.  Without copyright protection, anybody can use those images any way they want, and can use my name and reputation (another form of intellectual property) to promote their profit, and/or sully my name and reputation by associating it with things I don't want it associated with.

Please explain to me how I could use my talent to earn a living, establish and protect a good reputation, in a society that does not allow for the existence and protection of "intellectual property".
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bushwacker

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Re: Anti-IP Slogan I came up with
« Reply #6 on: December 05, 2005, 04:40:34 PM »

I think IP belongs in the context of TCP! :P How about that one?

Seriously though, intellectual property to me is a good thing, but the terms and enforcement should be determined by the owner him/her/itself, not some bigass government dominated by the RIAA/MPAA and their respective crack whores. Also, "fair use" is important. Personally,  I like aggreements like the GPL and Creative Commons License, which give flexibility and ballance for both originator and user/modifier.

Let's just start by getting back to the original 20 years max monopoly and move on (.org? [JK]) alredy! The way I see it, if your product doesn't make it for you in TWO FRIKIN DECADES,  than either it's just too ahead of it's time (you can't control that), or it really just sucks and you obviously didn't invent something that was worthwhile to very many people in the first place. These "70 years after death of author" scams are nothing but undeserved corporate welfare for losers that can't come up with anything better than a skilled and sleazy trial lawyer and a few lobbyiests.
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fourthgeek

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Re: Anti-IP Slogan I came up with
« Reply #7 on: December 07, 2005, 07:11:09 PM »

I'm not a big fan of intellectual property. To say that someone can own an idea is counterproductive to developing upon the idea. Trying to muddle about with some nebulous definition of "fair use", full of holes and gray areas, further confuses the definition. Do you own it, or not? If you do completely own it, do you also own the idea while it is in that person's head? Do you own that data while it is stored on another person's computer? Do you own the photons coming out of my computer screen simply because they are displaying data that you originally devised? Do you own that section of brain or disk where it is stored? Do you own a section of every newspaper that talks about your invention, and can you sue them for this?  To what extent can they explain your creation? Where is the line drawn?

People say that the economic impact is the key factor, but simply knowing that an invention exists will have an economic impact for or against something, depending upon how people react.

So how do we fix this?

By expressing intangible property, there is an assumed risk that it will travel, grow, and move between people. If you want to make money off of your idea, you should make yourself the best distributor of that information, or sell some other service that can make me want to get it from you.

This is besides the fact that a great portion of people willingly donate to / employ people who create IP, for said purposes.

Online games and music have also devised a good way of protecting themselves: require a login to access the information, being the best or only distributor. Although it's not universally applicable, it can surely be expanded to a large section of the entertainment market.

So, there are four ways.

1. Freelance and sell
2. Find a specific, devoted employer
3. Be the best/only distributor of the IP
4. Accept donations

I'm sure that there could be further protections in a free market. Intangible property existed for a looong time before IP laws, and aside from these that I mentioned, I'm sure that there could be further ways to profit or protect yourself.

Personally, i'm new to the anti-ip thing, so I'm not completely aware of all the arguments. All of this has come of my own mind.

Of course, you always have the option of keeping the idea to yourself.
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rabidfurby

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Re: Anti-IP Slogan I came up with
« Reply #8 on: December 08, 2005, 02:11:42 AM »

Personally, i'm new to the anti-ip thing, so I'm not completely aware of all the arguments. All of this has come of my own mind.

I highly recommend the writings of Stephan Kinsella, particularly There's No Such Thing as a Free Patent and Against Intellectual Property. The latter is a hefty read, at 46 pages, but well worth it.
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bushwacker

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Re: Anti-IP Slogan I came up with
« Reply #9 on: December 10, 2005, 06:51:09 AM »

Interesting arguments and info there, guys. I'll definately have to check it out when I have time, whenever the helvetica that will be... :)
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